Microsoft Alienates Customers With Forced Windows 10 Upgrades

win10Microsoft is facing public backlash for automatically upgrading the computers of unsuspecting customers to Windows 10.

Since public outcry Microsoft has reversed course, claiming that the forced installations were due to their accidentally making the Windows 10 upgrade checked by default. In theory, this means that there should be no more forced upgrades.

But the antagonism Microsoft is generating through such aggressive marketing methods is eroding customer goodwill. Microsoft has certainly been pushy about those “Get Windows 10” messages on Windows 7 and Windows 8 computers. And they’ve demonstrated aggressive Windows 10 tactics in the past, when they downloaded the Win10 installers onto computers without the user’s knowledge. So it didn’t come as much of a surprise to the IT community when reports began to trickle in that Microsoft had taken it one step further and actually performed system upgrades without user consent.

Microsoft Alienates And Frustrates Their Customers
Who wants to do business with a company that dictates when and how you upgrade your computer? Microsoft’s tactics show a vast disregard for the people who actually have to rely on their computers in real-world situations.

If you’ve ever upgraded your computer, you know things fail. Programs stop working. Devices stop working. Things are hectic until you’ve tested and re-tested everything. Even then, weeks later, you’ll stumble across something else to fix. I never upgrade without making several backups first. Microsoft didn’t even give people that chance before plunking Windows 10 in their laps.

Not only is this going to alienate their customer base, it makes people not want the software. People may start associating “Windows 10” with “aggressive marketing tactics” and steer clear. How are consumers supposed to believe tech security experts when we tell them to upgrade for their own safety? They’ll think we’re doing it for the same reasons Microsoft is foisting Win10 onto their computers: to keep them in the Windows ecosystem so they’ll buy more MicroStuff.

Upgrades Are Necessary, But Not Like This
Now, I’m all for upgrading, in certain circumstances. If you’re on Windows XP, for example, it’s long past time you did. Older software can’t run current antivirus, can’t run a modern Web browser, can’t receive security updates. Even Windows 7 is fairly long in the tooth at this point. From a security standpoint you really should be running Windows 8 or Windows 10. But I don’t want people to upgrade to cost them money or to make their lives difficult. I want them to upgrade because I don’t want them to suffer the financial loss and identity theft that comes with a severely infected computer. Trust me. I’ve seen it and it’s not pretty.

But forcing system software onto unwitting end users is unheard-of. You don’t pester users to upgrade. You don’t stealthily download installers onto their computers, taking up pricey bandwidth and drive space. And you certainly don’t upgrade somebody’s computer to an entirely new operating system without at least giving them the chance to opt out!

What Could Microsoft Do Instead?
Instead of aggressive marketing tactics, MS should spend their time and money educating users on why they need to upgrade older computers for security’s sake. But Microsoft would rather spend their time and money on ridiculous ads like “PC Does Whaaat?”, a collaborative effort between Microsoft, Intel, HP, Dell, and Lenovo geared towards encouraging more PC sales. According to the AP, this ad campaign cost $70 million.

I wonder how far $70 million would go towards helping consumers understand the necessity of upgrading — on their own terms.

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How To Configure Security Settings For Windows, Mac, iOS, and Android

androidWhen was the last time you checked the security preferences on your computer, tablet, or smart phone? Unfortunately, the default security settings for most devices are woefully inadequate, leaving you vulnerable to viruses, malware, and hacking attempts. Here’s more information on how to configure the security and privacy settings for Windows, Mac, iOS (iPhone and iPad), and Android.

(Related article: Don’t Trust The Default Security Settings by Triona Guidry, The Northwest Herald)

Windows 7

Windows 8

Windows 10

Mac (Yosemite aka Mac OS X 10.10)

iOS (iPhone, iPad)


Don’t forget to follow Tech Tips on Facebook and @trionaguidry on Twitter for more computer help for PC and Mac.

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