Windows XP Is Dead. Now What?

Windows XPAs you may have heard, Microsoft has ceased support for Windows XP. Many people assume it’s okay to keep using it. They’re dead wrong.

WinXP is already vulnerable to viruses because it’s been out so long. Now we have the nightmare scenario in which bugs are discovered but not fixed. Here’s how it goes: Microsoft announces a security vulnerability and offers patches for Win7 and Win8. The hackers rub their hands with glee and start testing to see if WinXP has the same vulnerability. Lo and behold it does, and they have an easy way to sneak into your computer.

Like the recently discovered Internet Explorer bug, which gives hackers a way to take over your entire system. It’s the first major vulnerability since XP’s demise. We know the bug exists in IE under XP. At first Microsoft said they weren’t going to patch it for XP, but now they’ve changed their minds. The question is, what about the next big bug? Using WinXP is like leaving your front door keys in the lock with a sign that says “Come on in, the best valuables are right over there!”

This isn’t a marketing gimmick or a way to increase PC sales, though I’m sure tech vendors don’t mind if you give them money. This is about you and the real-world repercussions of a hacked computer. Do you want your bank accounts wiped out? Do you want your identity stolen? Do you want your online identities hijacked? If not, then get off Windows XP.

Some of you will decide you don’t want to upgrade. That’s up to you, but I strongly recommend you reconsider. A very few of you – less than you think – will have some business-critical function that requires XP. Unless you are in that infinitesimal group, upgrade now.

What are your choices? Windows 7, Windows 8, or Mac. I did a rundown on them a while back based on a question from a reader. At this time, my recommendation stands at Windows 7 or Mac depending on your preference, with Windows 8 a distant runner-up due to its unfamiliar interface and lack of apps. Or, you could go pure mobile with tablet and smart phone.

For those of you who really, truly, honestly cannot upgrade from Windows XP, you have my condolences and some advice:

  • Use a browser other than Internet Explorer. Never use IE even for a moment.
  • Make sure you have the last round of updates Microsoft offered for XP. You can still use Automatic Updates to install them.
  • Run a good antivirus program.
  • Double-check regularly with Malwarebytes and CCleaner.
  • Don’t use Windows XP for finances or online purchasing. Ever. Your smart phone is safer at this point and I don’t advocate using smart phones for finances.
  • Don’t use WinXP to access social media sites (Facebook, Twitter, etc). Social media is a virus cesspool and you don’t have a lifejacket.
  • Plan your upgrade. This is not a permanent solution. Eventually your PC will fail and you will have to replace it.

Do you have questions about Windows XP’s end of support? Ask in the comments, and don’t forget to subscribe to Tech Tips by email and follow on Facebook. You can also follow @trionaguidry on Twitter.

Cryptolocker: Why Modern Computer Viruses Are More Dangerous Than Ever

crypt-messageToday’s computer viruses go beyond mere annoyance. How does holding your data for ransom sound? What about spying on you through your webcam, tracking your physical location, recording every keystroke you make? Welcome to the modern generation of computer threats, where infection means real-world consequences.

The latest virus making the rounds is Cryptolocker, a textbook example of all the truly nasty ways in which a modern computer virus can ruin your day. Cryptolocker encrypts your data with a one-way algorithm which mathematically cannot be reversed. If you don’t pay the ransom within the timeframe, the only key to your data is gone, kaput, goodbye.

You can’t restore your data by removing Cryptolocker, because removing the virus doesn’t decrypt the data. No tech support person in the world can decrypt it for you because it’s simply not possible without the key. Even police departments have paid the ransom, even as they recommend that consumers not do so.

Here are some resources on Cryptolocker so you can keep it from digging its sharp claws into your computer.

Cryptolocker started its initial spread via email attachments, which are fairly easy to avoid. But now it’s morphing into variants that can be transmitted via USB drive, and luring victims with fake software activation codes. Although it’s a Windows virus, like all viruses it can be transmitted via Macs and mobile devices. Following in the steps of other viruses, soon Cryptolocker will evolve into spreading via social media sites.

And this is just the start.

There are other viruses out there that can activate webcams – and yes, they can bypass the green light that tells you the webcam is on. They can listen through microphones. They can track your location via your mobile device. They can listen in on your conversations on social media.

Now, more than ever, it’s vital to protect yourself from computer viruses. Here are some Tech Tips resources to help:

Have you run into Cryptolocker or other similarly destructive viruses? Share in the comments, and don’t forget to subscribe to Tech Tips by email and follow on Facebook. You can also follow @trionaguidry on Twitter.

 

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