How To Protect Your Mobile Devices From Malware

ttt-logoMobile malware is on the rise, but few people maintain the same precautions on their tablets and phones that they do on their computers. Here’s what you need to do to stay protected.

Mobile devices need antivirus software just like any other computer, but watch for malware masquerading as antivirus. In general the same security rules we use for computers also apply to phones and tablets:

  • Use the latest version of your device’s software
  • Install all software updates
  • Back up your data
  • Install only well-known apps from known developers
  • Be wary of malware disguised as legitimate apps
  • When in doubt, don’t click

It’s a good idea to configure a passcode for your mobile device. You should also enable any “Find My Device” features your phone or tablet may have. You can configure most devices to erase any data after a certain number of incorrect login attempts, which will keep your information safe should your device become lost or stolen.

Remember that some threats are universal. A fake website that attempts to harvest your username and password can affect you whether you are viewing it on Windows, Mac, or any mobile device. You also need to use strong, secure passwords that are unique for every site, and enable two-factor authentication where possible.

Here are links to antivirus for mobile devices and more.

iOS Antivirus (iPad / iPhone)

iOS Security Tips (iPad / iPhone)

Android Antivirus

Android Security Tips

Tech Tips Articles

How To Create Strong Passwords (2016 Edition)

How To Configure Security Settings For Windows, Mac, iOS, and Android

How To Configure Security Settings For Windows, Mac, iOS, and Android

androidWhen was the last time you checked the security preferences on your computer, tablet, or smart phone? Unfortunately, the default security settings for most devices are woefully inadequate, leaving you vulnerable to viruses, malware, and hacking attempts. Here’s more information on how to configure the security and privacy settings for Windows, Mac, iOS (iPhone and iPad), and Android.

(Related article: Don’t Trust The Default Security Settings by Triona Guidry, The Northwest Herald)

Windows 7

Windows 8

Windows 10

Mac (Yosemite aka Mac OS X 10.10)

iOS (iPhone, iPad)

Android

Don’t forget to follow Tech Tips on Facebook and @trionaguidry on Twitter for more computer help for PC and Mac.

A Parent’s Guide To Protecting Your Kids Online

kidsIt’s hard to protect kids online, because parents and educators often have a hard time finding resources that can help them understand the latest risks and recommendations. I’ve gathered a variety of information in one place so you can learn about antivirus, parental controls, and protecting your kids while using mobile devices and video games.

Kids’ computers are among the most vulnerable to security threats. That’s not to say your kids are doing anything wrong. On the contrary, they’re the victims. Not only do virus-writers like to booby-trap kids with malicious web sites, they also like to infiltrate legitimate ones. Kids are also at much at risk of identity theft as any Internet user. More so, because cyberbullying has become such a deadly and devastating menace.

These are resources every parent needs to know about how computer viruses and Internet threats work. If you have questions, please feel free to comment. You can also subscribe to Tech Tips by email and follow on Facebook. You can also follow @trionaguidry on Twitter.

Antivirus And Security

Mobile Devices

Video Games

Cyberbullying And Harassment

 

Hands-On With The Samsung Galaxy S4, Plus Antivirus For Android

galaxy-s4I recently had the opportunity to test-drive the Samsung Galaxy S4 from Verizon. If you’re looking for a powerful smart phone with some of the features of a tablet, this might be the device for you.

Related article: Galaxy S4: Vivid Color, Vibrant Performance by Triona Guidry (The Northwest Herald)

The Galaxy S4 looks similar to the Galaxy Note II, which I previously reviewed. In the hand it feels light and lively, matched by smooth performance when you use it. The 1080p Super AMOLED screen is unbelievably vivid even in sunlight, just the thing for entertainment on the go.

The S Apps are interesting, but I don’t know anyone who buys a device solely for the manufacturer’s add-on apps. If you want them they’re there, but as a recent article in Forbes asked, do people actually use these brand-name features? If you do, I’m curious to hear how you like them.

The Galaxy S4 is an Android device so you’ll get the full performance of Android 4.2 Jelly Bean plus the features available in the Google Play store. Just watch out for bad apps! Android is notorious for malware. You should run an antivirus program on any mobile device you use. For Android I am fond of Sophos’s Android security app. It’s free so there’s no excuse not to protect yourself.

Verizon is promoting its VZ Security service, which gives you antivirus plus SiteAdvisor for free, or antivirus, SiteAdvisor, and some other goodies for $1.99/month. Whether you pick Sophos, Verizon, or another product, please make sure you are running legitimate antivirus. Fake antivirus is skyrocketing on Android along with other malware.

Have you tried the Samsung Galaxy series? What do you think? Share in the comments, and don’t forget to subscribe to Tech Tips by email and follow on Facebook. You can also follow @trionaguidry on Twitter.

 Disclaimer: Samsung Galaxy S4 provided by Verizon; this is an unpaid review.

 

 

Hands-On With The BlackBerry Z10

z10I recently spent some quality time with the new BlackBerry Z10. The Z10 is a lightweight, keyboardless smart phone… wait, a keyboardless BlackBerry? How does that work? Let’s find out.

The Z10 has a 1.5GHz dual-core Qualcomm processor with 2GB of RAM and a 4.2-inch 1,280-by-768 LCD display at 356 pixels per inch. It’s sized about the same as an iPhone, 5.1 by 2.6 by .35 inches, weighing 4.8 ounces.

Related article: Review: Will the new Z10 save BlackBerry? by Triona Guidry (The Northwest Herald)

The Unboxing

First, we have to install the battery. Fortunately the Z10’s case is a snap to open, no finger-mashing required. Once that’s done the unit launches into a setup wizard that talks you through a brief configuration process. It also gives you the basics of the Z10’s swipes and gestures.

I like to evaluate new products from the perspective of a brand-new user. How do you figure out how it works? What resources are available to help? In the case of the Z10, the learning curve is short and sweet. Swipe to the Hub for notifications, swipe to your apps to launch them. The Z10 reminds you with helpful glowing arrows if, for example, you forget you have to swipe from the bottom up to unlock your phone.

The Z10’s Software Keyboard

Instead of physical keyboard, the Z10 comes with a software keyboard which is responsive enough that you might forget it’s not physical. Predictive completion learns as you type, so your phone quickly becomes customized to your preferences. In other words, it’s still a BlackBerry even with a software keyboard. Weird but true.

BlackBerry 10

The Z10 runs BlackBerry’s signature BlackBerry 10 software, which has received rare accolades from the tech industry. It’s not hard to see why. BB10 is sleek and intuitive, giving you a no-frills environment that lets you get the job done with minimal interference. However, that easy of use comes at the cost of customization. This isn’t Android; you can’t just arrange your icons any old way you like. But die-hard BlackBerry fans will be pleased.

Features, Functions, And Apps

Unfortunately you’re not going to find as many apps for BlackBerry as for iOS and Android. BlackBerry’s app store simply hasn’t been around long enough yet, so you might find yourself waiting (and wondering) if your favorite apps will be released for it.

The Z10’s Help section rocks. It’s well-organized and helps you find everything you need to know, which is vital considering that this phone is brand new to the market. I especially liked the prominent Passwords & Security section which can help you protect your phone.

Related article: Tools To Protect Your Smart Phone From Malware

Conclusions

The Z10 is a decent entry into the smart phone arena, but BlackBerry has a steep climb ahead as it struggles to catch up to its competitors.

What do you think? Can BlackBerry woo its CrackBerry addicts back into the fold or has the company lost too much momentum? Share in the comments, and don’t forget to  subscribe to Tech Tips by email and follow on Facebook. You can also follow @trionaguidry on Twitter.

Hybrid Devices: You Got Smart Phone In My Tablet!

I recently had the opportunity to test-drive the Samsung Galaxy Note II, a hybrid device that lies somewhere between a smart phone and a tablet. Are these hybrid devices just a fad or will they stick around?

From the review I wrote for The Northwest Herald:

The Galaxy Note is a hybrid Android device. At approximately 3.17-by-5.95-by-0.3 inches and weighing 6.44 ounces, it’s large enough that it may feel awkward while making calls. But the 5.5-inch HD Super AMOLED display (1,280 x 720) is so gorgeous that you might not notice. (read more)

These hybrid devices are called by a variety of names, including phablet which I personally think sounds phabulous. They can be powerful devices. The Galaxy Note I tested has enough oomph to run some seriously resource-intensive apps. Hybrids also have larger screens but are still portable enough to fit in a pocket.

I can understand the attraction of a device like the Galaxy Note. There are a lot of things I would do with my smart phone if it were big enough for me to see what I’m doing, and it would be nice not having to schlep a full-sized tablet around.

I’ve seen a lot of tech gadgets flash then fizzle. I remember when everyone and their brother had a Palm Pilot, and I recall Microsoft’s original attempt at a tablet. But the technology’s gotten to the point where the things we wanted to do with those devices is both possible and affordable, like handwriting recognition and the ability to watch video or play games.

So I think phone/tablet hybrids or phablets or whatever you want to call them will stick with us a while. They may not be for everyone but there is a segment of the market that wants a single device to replace the cumbersome smart-phone-plus-tablet combo.

As I reiterated in the column, you need to secure your mobile devices as well. Here are some previous Tech Tips articles on mobile security and more:

Disclaimer: Galaxy Note II provided by Verizon; my opinions remain my own.

Have you tried a hybrid device? Which mobile devices do you prefer? Share in the comments and don’t forget to  subscribe to Tech Tips by email and follow on Facebook. You can also follow @trionaguidry on Twitter.

Holiday Tech Gadgets: How To Choose A Mobile Device Platform

It’s an exciting time in mobile technology as three major vendors vie for our holiday shopping dollars. In this month’s The Northwest Herald I’m discussing the season’s hottest gadgets. From the article:

Mobile technology is hot this holiday season, and you’ll find gadgets to fit every interest and budget. I visited AT&T and Verizon to get the latest news. (read more)

Smart phones and tablets are this year’s top sellers, which begs the question: What’s the difference between the Big Three mobile platforms, iOS, Android, and Windows?

Apple iOS
Runs on: iPhone, iPad, iPod
You may not know iOS by name, but if you’re familiar with an iPhone screen, you know what it looks like. iOS is Apple’s proprietary system for its iDevices. iOS is known for its ease of use and its seamless compatibility across all your iPhones, iPads, and iPods.

Google Android
Runs on: Tablets and smart phones
When it comes to Android, Google makes the software and other manufacturers like Samsung make the hardware. Android is a powerful and flexible platform but may be too complex for the beginner. There’s also a rampant malware problem on Android because of lax standards in Google’s Marketplace plus a rash of lookalike app stores.

Windows Phone / Windows 8 / Windows RT
Runs on: Tablets and smart phones
If you don’t know what to call Windows on mobile devices, you’re not alone. Windows Phone is simple enough; it’s Windows on a phone. Windows RT is Windows 8 on ARM-based tablets, notably Microsoft’s own Surface. However, WinRT is not as flexible as the full Windows 8 on a PC.

How do you know which mobile platform is right for you? It depends on what you’re currently using. If you have a Windows Phone and love it, then it makes sense to stay with Windows for your mobile devices. If you adore your Samsung Galaxy, you’re an Android fan. All platforms offer similar features as far as email, web, and social media. As far as ease of use, I would say iOS is the easiest, followed closely by Windows 8 with Android last because of its complexity

What about other mobile platforms like Blackberry or Symbian? At this point, Blackberry manufacturer RIM is having so many problems they can barely compete – they released Blackberry 10, but the universe barely blinked. Symbian is still around but has been largely supplanted by Windows Phone.

What tech gadgets are you considering for the holidays? Find anything fun and exciting? Share in the comments and don’t forget to subscribe to Tech Tips by email and follow on Facebook. You can also follow @trionaguidry on Twitter.

 

 

Dear Microsoft: Why Your Customers Hate Windows 8

The computer industry gives short shrift to small business and home users. This has never been more clear to me than with the introduction of Windows 8, so I wrote this letter to Microsoft on behalf of the Nation of Windows Users.

Dear Microsoft,

We know you’re excited about Windows 8, and you want us to be excited too. And you can’t figure out why we’re all “meh” when you want us to be all “YEAH!”

The Look
We hate Windows 8. You’re forcing a new look on us, when it’s all we can do to keep up with our everyday tasks. Windows 8 may have all sorts of nifty improvements, but that’s no good if it takes us two hours just to figure out how we used to do something.

Don’t make fun of us if we aren’t computer-savvy. Not everybody is a tech guru. For some people, even moving an icon on the desktop is a major change. That’s not our fault. It’s YOUR fault if you don’t understand that some people want to concentrate on what they need to do, rather than trying to figure out how to go about getting it done on an unfamiliar system.

Don’t tell us we’ll learn to love it. We don’t have time. If we have to learn something new, we might as well go over to Apple and see what the fuss is about Macs.

No Start Menu
You spent the last 20 years teaching us the Start menu. Remember how angry we were when you yanked the old Office Toolbar and replaced it with the ugly Ribbon? You told us, “You’ll love it, it’s so much better.”

Well, we don’t, and it isn’t. Some people still haven’t gotten used to it, and haven’t upgraded as a result. You make it much harder for us to want to buy your stuff when you treat us like children who need to have decisions made for us.

Usability Over Security
And when you make us hang onto our old stuff because the new stuff takes too much time and effort to learn, you make it nearly impossible to secure our systems. We’re more concerned about usability than whether or not we’re running vulnerable software. That’s part of the reason there’s such a virus problem on Windows (that, and your sieve-like code).

The Hype
You keep telling us every version of Windows is the best yet. You said Vista was awesome and then you backpedaled because it sucked. Same for Windows ME. You used to tell us the Windows Vista & 7 interface was da bomb but now it’s “dated and cheesy”. Why should we believe you about Windows 8? We know today’s new program will be tomorrow’s garbage. Stop pretending otherwise.

The Tablet Craze
So you’re introducing the Surface tablet. Whoopee. We’ve already got iPads and Androids and other mobile devices. Your Windows Phone may be a technological marvel but it’s got minimal market share.

We know Windows 8 is more about you trying to break into the tablet market to compete with Google and Apple, and less about the people who rely on Windows *gasp* to get actual work done.

In short, we don’t care how fancy your new tablet is, nor how well Windows 8 works on it, if Windows 8 isn’t going to offer us benefits on the PCs we already own.

The Touchy-Swipey Thing
So Windows 8 is all touchy-swipey. No one, least of all you, has any idea how touchy-swipey is going to work with PCs that have keyboards and mice. It may be the wave of the future, but it doesn’t help us get work done. It’s just another annoying change on top of a lot of other annoying changes. Why do we want anything to do with Windows 8 if it’s going to be this much trouble?

No SP2 for Windows 7
And now you’re telling us that you’re not introducing another Service Pack for Windows 7. We’ve been around the block with you a few times and we know this is the death knell for a system you’re trying to obsolete in favor of new products and profits.

Maybe you’re right, Microsoft. Maybe Windows 8 really is the greatest thing in the history of creation… and maybe it’s not. We really want to like you, but we’re jaded after all the promises you’ve broken. You’re going to have to try harder than Windows 8 if you want to win us back.

Sincerely, Your (Former?) Customers

Other Tech Tips articles on Windows 8 you may enjoy:

Want to give Microsoft a piece of your mind over Windows 8? Share in the comments!

Tools To Protect Your Smartphone From Malware

Do you run antivirus on your smartphone? This month in The Northwest Herald, I talk about the exponential increase in malware on smartphones and what you can do to protect yourself. From the article:

Yet if I were to ask if you run antivirus on your phone, you would probably say no. Nobody mentions malware when you buy a phone, they’re too busy extolling the fancy features. All those cool apps are fine until you realize some virus has been silently snooping on your activities.

Here are links to the latest options for mobile antivirus. The available options are changing all the time as new devices and systems are introduced. I’ve also included links to some of my previous Tech Tips articles which can help you secure your smartphone.

Tech Tips articles on smartphone security

 Mobile Antivirus Options

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How To Avoid Malware On Mobile Devices

Android malware rose 1,200% last year. Android represents 59% of smartphones shipped in 2012 Q1. This does not bode well.

Mobile device security is not on the average person’s radar, yet we’re toting these devices everywhere and using them for just about everything. Clearly we can’t afford to be lax.

Here is an easy primer on how you can protect your mobile devices from malware, whether you use an Android, iPhone, iPad, or other device.

Only buy apps from approved stores
Android users in particular are getting kicked in the butt over installing apps from non-Google marketplaces. Perhaps you think you’d never do that, but poisoned search engine results and malicious web pages can trick you into thinking you’re using Google’s marketplace when you’re not. Be careful when installing apps.

Don’t jailbreak your phone
Jailbreaking means working around the manufacturer’s lockouts so you can have more freedom to play with the configuration. It also can brick your phone – as in, turn it into a useless brick – and opens a greater possibility of malware infection. So unless you are a professional geek, don’t do it.

Install antivirus
Mobile antivirus may be rudimentary, but you still want it. Here are some choices:

Apply computer security to mobile devices
You know all those things I keep saying about not clicking links in email, avoiding Facebook scams, and so forth? They apply to your mobile devices, too. That’s the other way mobile malware is spreading, via social media and drive-by download.

Tell your friends
Let the people around you know about the importance of securing their mobile devices. Why not start by forwarding them a link to this article?

How are you protecting your mobile devices? Share in the comments!

Image(s): FreeDigitalPhotos.net